Today’s Bible passages are: Numbers 23, Psalm 64-65, Isaiah 13, and 1 Peter 2

1 Peter 2 ImageBy Lisa Velthouse

We have a five-week-old in the house, so we are sleep-deprived and groggy-eyed. We are basketfuls of tiny baby clothes in the laundry room. We are pacifiers everywhere. We are hunger all the time. Between the little guy and me alone, there is always at least one person who wants to be eating.

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A few nights ago, while my husband was away at work and some friends were visiting, the baby cried seemingly forever. But he had just eaten. He had a dry diaper too, and it was an hour past his usual bedtime, and this was his angry cry. I knew him well enough already to know he was trying to pull a power play—this mama was determined not to be manipulated, and to help him learn the simple and basic skill of falling asleep instead. Still, it was mind-numbing to sit there, listening to him like that.

I’ve heard it said somewhere that an infant’s cry has a physiological effect on a woman: specifically, it elicits a sense of actual panic in her. I can’t say whether or not that claim is real science, but anecdotally I know it’s true.… Continue Reading

Today’s Bible passages are: Numbers 22, Psalm 62-63, Isaiah 11-12, and James 5

Numbers 22 ArtBy Samira Gast

Today’s art is a response to Numbers 22:

…God’s anger was kindled because he went, and the angel of the Lord took his stand in the way as his adversary. Now he was riding on the donkey, and his two servants were with him. And the donkey saw the angel of the Lord standing in the road, with a drawn sword in his hand. And the donkey turned aside out of the road and went into the field. And Balaam struck the donkey, to turn her into the road. Then the angel of the Lord stood in a narrow path between the vineyards, with a wall on either side. And when the donkey saw the angel of the Lord, she pushed against the wall and pressed Balaam’s foot against the wall. So he struck her again. Then the angel of the Lord went ahead and stood in a narrow place, where there was no way to turn either to the right or to the left. When the donkey saw the angel of the Lord, she lay down under Balaam. And Balaam’s anger was kindled, and he struck the donkey with his staff.

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Today’s Bible passages are: Numbers 21, Psalm 60-61, Isaiah 10, and James 4

James 4 imageBy Laurie Short

You’ve probably heard the quote, “If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans.” It’s not a Bible verse, but I think I’ll vote for it when the next translation comes out. However it could be a contender for a loose paraphrase of James 4:13–15:

Now listen, you who say, “Today or tomorrow we will go to this or that city, spend a year there, carry on business and make money.” Why, you do not even know what will happen tomorrow. What is your life? You are a mist that appears for a little while and then vanishes. [Don’t hold back, James. Tell us how you really feel.] Instead, you ought to say, “If it is the Lord’s will, we will live and do this or that.”

I don’t know if you’ve noticed, but James isn’t exactly a beat around the bush guy. In other places in this chapter, he calls his readers adulterous, double minded, greedy, slanderous, judgmental and hypocritical. So what if he happens to be right? He could at least try to say it nicely.

But there is something about v.13-15 that grips me.… Continue Reading

Today’s Bible passages are: Numbers 17-18, Psalm 55, Isaiah 7, and James 1

Isaiah 7 artBy Jo Miller, guest contributor

As I read today’s Scripture, I was overwhelmed by the goodness of God’s word, by all the amazing things He shares with us. But the verse that my mind kept going back to was Isaiah 7:4 where God says to Isaiah to tell Ahaz, “Keep calm and don’t be afraid”(NIV).
Now I don’t know if you have noticed all the posters that have been so popular recently with the ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ or any of the other modified slogans. “Really Jo”, I said to myself, “You’re really going to hop on that band wagon.” I have never really appreciated all the different versions of this logo and didn’t even know where the slogan originated; so I looked it up. Apparently, ‘keep calm and carry on’ was part of a slogan campaign the British Ministry of Information came up with to boost the morale of the citizens in the face of war. The government considered it the duty of the people to continue on in the midst of the inevitable bombing and gas attacks.
It seems that the campaign was a huge failure and the poster was never actually displayed in spite of thousands being printed.… Continue Reading